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Centre National De La Recherche Scientifique

Paris, France

The research group at LIMSI bring to HUMAINE expertise in multimodal communication and in spoken language processing.. Research on multimodal communication includes typologies of cooperation between modalities, creation / annotation / analysis of corpora of multimodal human-human and human-computer interactions, design of bi-directional multimodal interfaces featuring cooperation between input modalities (e.g. speech and gestures) and output modalities (e.g. specification of 2D embodied conversational agents including emotional tags), and application to user interfaces for autistic people. Research on spoken language processing includes the creation and annotation of spoken dialogs and the design of spoken interactive systems, nd the question of perceptual detection and prosodic cues analysis of emotional behavior in a spontaneous speech corpus of real Human-Human dialogs. Future plans concern the relations between emotions and spoken / multimodal behaviors, including the following directions: survey of spoken and multimodal cues of emotional state, creation of multimodal human-human and human-computer corpora including real human-computer interactions / emotion eliciting protocols / theatre / movie samples, specification of mark-up language for the annotation of emotions, use of cues in the multimodal behavior for easing the annotation of emotion in speech, produce knowledge out of multimodal corpora analysis for both the automatic analysis of emotions in user’s behavior, and the synthesis of multimodal emotional behavior in embodied agents. LIMSI-CNRS has been involved in several projects such as IST ISLE (International Standards for Language Engineering: annotation of multimodal behavior), IST NICE (Natural Interaction with Computers for Edutainment: multimodal embodied agents for a game application), IST Amitiés (Automated Multilingual Interaction with Information and Services: creation of a corpus of real agent-client dialogs at a Stock Exchange Customer Service Center).

Jean-Claude Martin is Assistant Professor and Head of the Conversational Agents Team created in 2003 within the Architecture and Models for Interaction Group (AMI) at LIMSI-CNRS. His research programme is about multimodal communication including typologies of cooperation between modalities, creation / annotation / analysis of corpora of multimodal human-human and human computer interactions, design of bi-directional multimodal interfaces featuring cooperation between input modalities (e.g. speech and gestures) and output modalities (e.g. specification of 2D embodied conversational agents including emotional tags), application to user interfaces for game application. He has been involved in European research project about International Standards for Language E (IST-ISLE), Natural Interactive Communication for Edutainment (NICE), Computer Mediated Communication (MagicLounge). He has co-organised in May 2002 a workshop at the Language and Resources Evaluation Conference (LREC) on “Multimodal Language Resources” and is a member of the Programme Committee of conferences such as the Fifth International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces (ICMI’2003). For more information, see Jean-Claude Martin's Homepage

Laurence Devillers received the MS degree in Electrical Engineering in 1986 and the PhD degree in Computer Science in 1992, both from the University of Paris XI, Orsay. She has been working in speech recognition at LIMSI-CNRS since 1987, and was appointed an Assistant Professor at the University of Paris XI, Orsay in 1995. She was involved in several European projects: Esprit 860, Polyglot, Mask and Railtel. Her early research activities focused on hybrid continuous speech recognition systems combining artificial neural networks and hidden Markov Models. Since 1994, her research main interests concern spoken dialog systems, primarily strategies for dialog management, detecting emotion and user modeling. For more information, see Laurence Deviller's Homepage

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